#Bookreview – Memoir of a Mad Woman by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

book reviews

What Amazon says

A novelette from the award-winning author of The Fall of Lilith and Son of the Serpent, Vashti Quiroz-Vega.

Who can explain how madness begins?

This is the story of Emma. Reared by a religious fanatic, orphaned at a young age and sent to a mental institution and an orphanage. Molested and betrayed by the people who should be watching over her…

Who can say that madness has no logic?

During a fight, Emma’s best friend punched her in the abdomen. Since then, Emma has believed there’s something damaged inside of her.

Every month… she bleeds.
She tries to fight it all her life, but the pain and the blood return twenty-eight days later… and the cycle begins again.

But Emma, even in her madness, knows how to take care of herself.
She knows how to make things right…

You may not agree…
But, who can reason with insanity?

Read this tragic but fascinating tale and traverse the labyrinthine passages of madness.

My review

I read this book over a week ago and I have dwelled on it’s content and message, on and off, over that time. This book is not very long but it is deeply disturbing and really highlights the desperate plight of orphan girls who are institutionalized and who loose all control over their lives. Imagine being all alone in this world and having no-one to turn to when spiteful caregivers, who have no calling to go into their selected field, other than possibly a need for money, turn against you and allow other, even more evil people, to abuse you continuously. This is the fate of Emma, a young girl whose father abandons his family and whose fanatical mother dies in a fire.

Emma is placed in an institution but she does not thrive there. She is not liked by the woman in charge, Miss McKenna, and is disappointed even by her best friend, Jessica, who is self centred and selfish. After an altercation with Jessica, Miss McKenna turns completely against Emma and allows some very bad abuse of her to take place on an on-going basis. This ultimately leads to the complete disintegration of Emma’s mind and her ability to differentiate between right and wrong.

Considering the short length of this book, the author does manage to portray the breakdown of Emma’s mind fairly well. It is clearly demonstrated that, from an early age, that Emma reacts with strong resentment when people in her life let her down and that she is not able to identify any mitigating circumstances for their actions which would enable her to forgive them. This is indicative of what is to come in terms of the deterioration of her mental status when she suffers abuse later on in her life. I would have liked to see some further development of Miss McKenna and to have understood why she disliked Emma so much but the ability of this little book to disturb my peace of mind so effectively made it worthy of a five star rating.

Purchase Memoir of a Mad Woman

42 thoughts on “#Bookreview – Memoir of a Mad Woman by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

  1. Hello, Robbie! Thank you so much for posting this wonderful review on your blog. I’m grateful that you read and reviewed my novelette. This is a wonderful surprise! ❤ xo

    Liked by 1 person

      1. The story is loosely based on the case files of a female psychopath. Unfortunately, these horrible things do happen in many institutions. Thank you. 🙂

        Like

  2. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord Blog Magazine and commented:
    Robbie Cheadle with her review for Memoir of a Mad Woman by Vashti Quiroz Vega…
    I read this book over a week ago and I have dwelled on it’s content and message, on and off, over that time. This book is not very long but it is deeply disturbing and really highlights the desperate plight of orphan girls who are institutionalized and who loose all control over their lives. Imagine being all alone in this world and having no-one to turn to when spiteful caregivers, who have no calling to go into their selected field, other than possibly a need for money, turn against you and allow other, even more evil people, to abuse you continuously. This is the fate of Emma, a young girl whose father abandons his family and whose fanatical mother dies in a fire.

    To read the full review follow the link…

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Any book that causes people to reflect on the soul-shattering, lasting, and often hidden aftermath of abuse and the debilitating road into mental-illness that often accompanies it, is a must read for me for I have traveled that road and survived it. The comments show clearly that this book is thought provoking. Bravo, Vashti. Thanks for the thoughtful review, Robbie.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Coming from you that means a lot, Suzanne. I read your memoir, “Empty Chairs” and it was powerful. I still think about it now and then. You’re definitely a strong woman and survivor, my friend. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thanks, Vashti. ❤️️Although I’m not all that certain about the ‘strong’ stuff, my friend I think that maybe I’m just too pig-headed to stay down for long.😊

        Liked by 1 person

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