Interview with horror author Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Thank you, author, Kaye Lynne Booth, for inviting me over to Writing to be Read to talk about my dark/horror writing and how I started writing in this genre.

IMG_9902

Today my guest is an author who I’ve gotten to know well, because she is a member of the Writing to be Read team, where she writes a monthly blog segment on children’s literature that’s proven to be very popular, “Growing Bookworms”. By day she walks in the world of fondant and children’s fiction, but when darkness falls she transforms into an emerging horror author. But this author doesn’t just emerge, she explodes onto the scene with  this month’s release of her first novel length horror tale, Through the Nethergate.  In addition, this month she also has a short story appearing  in  Dan Alatorre’s Nightmarland anthology, and another coming out in the WordCrafter paranormal anthology, Whispers of the Past. I’m really excited to be able to interview her about her experiences with horror, so please help me welcome author Roberta Eaton Cheadle.

Kaye: You started out writing children’s stories with your son, but you’ve recently leaped into the horror realm, which is kind of at the opposite extreme of the spectrum. Was that a hard transition for you?

Roberta: It wasn’t a hard transition for me at all. I have always loved supernatural, horror and dark psychological thrillers so I think this genre comes naturally to me. More recently I have been reading and re-reading a lot of dystopian fiction such as Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and The Long Walk by Richard Bachman (aka Stephen King).

I can remember reading my Mom’s copy of Stephen King’s The Shining behind the couch in the lounge when I was ten years old. After that book, I worked my way through the rest of her Stephen King collection and several other adult horror books too.

Kaye: Can you name one thing you have to think about when writing horror that you might not ever think about when writing for children, (or any other genre, maybe)?

Roberta: When writing from the point of view of the victim, I need to imagine their fear and describe this in a way that brings out the same emotion in the reader. When writing from the point of view of the party who sees a ghost or discovers a body, I need to imagine their shock and horror at what they are seeing. To describe the tumultuous feelings that would bubble up inside them at seeing something truly frightening or gruesome.

I would never attempt to scare children or invoke feelings of fear and anxiety in them. My Sir Chocolate books series is my attempt to draw children into a happy and safe world of complete fantasy where good always wins and any less likable characters are drawn into the circle of friendship and become part of the team.

Read the rest of this interview here: https://kayelynnebooth.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/interview-with-horror-author-roberta-eaton-cheadle/

9 thoughts on “Interview with horror author Roberta Eaton Cheadle

    1. Interestingly enough, Norah, that is the only one of his books I haven’t read. I probably should but I like getting my advice from people I know like Charli, Esther, Kaye and Dan who have all helped me tremendously. There are also all the Carrot Ranch writers who have inspired and helped me like you and Miss D.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for including me in the list of people who’ve helped you, Robbie. But I highly recommend Stephen King’s book. I listened to it and he read it. It’s semi-autobiographical and semi-writing skills. It’s a fantastic read. I found it inspirational. I’m sure you’d enjoy it.

        Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.