Roberta Writes: Thursday Doors – Bothongo Rhino and Lion Nature Reserve

Welcome to Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments below, anytime between 12:01 am Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

I was going to post about Maropeng Visitor Centre today and some of the displays relating to early man, but my week didn’t go according to plan and I didn’t have time to do the necessary research. If you would like to know why it was so traumatic, you can read about it here: https://robbiesinspiration.wordpress.com/2021/09/17/robbies-inspiration-thursday-doors-when-operations-go-pear-shaped/

Instead, I am posting pictures from our visit to the Bothongo Rhino and Lion Nature Reserve near Magaliesberg.

If you’d like to learn more about this reserve, you can do so here: https://www.rhinolion.co.za/

This is the exit gate
Entrance and exit gates from the exit side

The lions are not in a cage, their enclosure is large. They just happened to be lying right at the gate so we weren’t allowed into their enclosure and had to take pictures though the fence.

Here is a video clip of warthogs in the wild:

Here is a clip of the wild dogs:

You can join in Thursday Doors here: https://nofacilities.com/2021/09/16/thirsty-pagan-doors/

44 thoughts on “Roberta Writes: Thursday Doors – Bothongo Rhino and Lion Nature Reserve

  1. Those lions seem to be the role model for our cats – lay down in front of the door and the humans won’t bother you.
    Those are impressive gates and I love to pictures and videos of the animals. I’m glad there are places were they can roam safely.

    I hope you son continues to improve and that your week ahead is closer to normal.

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    1. Hi Dan, it is amazing to see lions and other big cats in the wild and see the similarities with domestic cats. They are very interesting to watch. I enjoyed the wild dogs as I haven’t seen those in the wild before and the rhinos were amazing. We rarely see them with horns because of the poaching.

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    1. Hi Dave, I’ve seen lions quite often in the reserves and they are so many similarities to domestic cats. They are wonderful to watch. It was great to see rhinos with their horns. A lot of the parks dehorn them because of the poaching which is very sad. This park is near the city and has a lot of security.

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      1. Thank you for the reply, Robbie! Different kinds of felines do have much in common. Great that you’ve seen lions many times (certainly more than I have) to witness that!

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    1. Hi Liz, I do love going to see African animals in the reserves. These animals are fed so they are not ‘wild’ like the ones in the Kruger National Park so you can go really close to them. It always makes me a little sad, but this is better than nothing.

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      1. I think it also depends on the type of zoo. I know when I was a child that there were very limited cages. We have one here that has open divided spaces, hopefully leaving enough room for the limited animals they allow to roam. Unlike perhaps some where the enclosures are very limited. Sometimes though I can understand the wish to protect an endangered animal, especially from poachers. But then there are thieves everywhere for everything.

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      2. I do understand the need for zoos, Jules. Even the animal sanctuaries are largely animals in captivity. If they are fed then they are not really wild. Our national game parks are very big. The Kruger National Park is almost the size of Belgium and the animals must survive on their own.

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