Ask the Authors 2022 Book & Blog Series: Plot/Storyline – Featuring Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Thank you to Kaye Lynne Booth for featuring me for her Ask the Authors 2022 Book & Blog Series: Plot/Storyline.

Ask the Authors 2022

Welcome back to the “Ask the Authors 2022” Saturday blog series.

If you missed them, you can catch the first two segments here:

Segment 1 – Introductions for Kaye Lynne Booth & Kevin Killany/Writing Life Q & A

Segment 2Introduction for Bobby Nash/Pre-Writing Rituals Q & A

This is the third segment for this series and today I’m going to introduce you to contributing author, Roberta Eaton Cheadle, who shares her essay about her own publishing journey in the book, and bring you a Q & A on plot, or storyline, from the WordCrafter writing reference anthology, Ask the Authors 2022.

Meet Roberta Eaton Cheadle

Roberta Eaton Cheadle is a writer of young adult and adult fiction in the supernatural fantasy, historical horror, and historical supernatural genres. Under the name Robbie Cheadle, she is a South African children’s author, publishing the Sir Chocolate series with her son, Michael, and a poet with 2 published poetry books.

To date, Roberta has published two novels, Through the Nethergate, and A Ghost and His Gold, along with several short stories in various anthologies including Whispers of the PastSpirits of the West, and Where Spirits Linger, all edited and compiled by Kaye Lynne Booth, and Dark Visions, NightmarelandSpellboundWings & Fire, and Shadowland, all compiled by Dan Alatorre.

Robbie is also a member of the Writing to be Read blogging team and co-editor of Poetry Treasures (2021) and Poetry Treasures 2: Relationships (2022), two poetry anthologies with contributing authors who were guests from her “Treasuring Poetry” blog series. When she is not writing, Robbie enjoys working in the garden and creating fondant and cake artworks to be featured in her children’s books.

And now for the Q & A.

Plot/Storyline

How do you feel about prologues? Love them or hate them? Why?

Mario Acevedo: I’m not a fan of prologues and as I see them as superfluous to the story. If you must include a prologue, then call it Chapter One to make sure readers like me won’t flip past it.

Paul Kane: I have no strong feelings about them either way. Sometimes I’ve used them, other times I’ve gone straight into Chapter One. I know some writers who say if you can avoid Prologues then do it and just start with the first chapter, but I think if it serves a purpose then there’s a place for one. I tend to include them in the thrillers, because it’s always an event that kicks things off – so for example in Her Last Secret, it’s the death of Jordan Radcliffe, in Her Husband’s Grave it’s the discovery of a body on Golden Sands beach, and in The Family Lie it’s a couple of campers who see a man on fire in the woods. I then split the narrative into parts, and in Chapter One I tend to introduce the main protagonist, so it might be the person who’ll be doing the investigating; someone whose eyes we’ll be seeing most of the events in the book through.

Continue reading here: https://writingtoberead.com/2022/05/21/ask-the-authors-2022-book-blog-series-plot-storyline/

42 thoughts on “Ask the Authors 2022 Book & Blog Series: Plot/Storyline – Featuring Roberta Eaton Cheadle

    1. Thank you, Martina. I am back to writing for children currently. I think its because the world seems a bit dark and dismal so writing and illustrating fun tales for children makes me happy.

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  1. As a READER, I love both prologues and epilogues. I like an introduction and always read it (and sometimes refer back to it later) and epilogues for me are a great wrap up for the book. I’m not fond of books that don’t finish their ending. I always want to know REALLY what happened.

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    1. HI Marilyn, I can relate to that 100%. I don’t like books that leave loose ends, or worse, end of a cliff hanger. It’s one of the reasons I rarely read series. I also don’t mind prologues and epilogues. It depends on the book as to whether they are needed or not.

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