Thursday Doors – Dumfries, Scotland

Welcome to Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments below, anytime between 12:01 am Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

During our 2019 trip to Scotland, we visited Dumfries to meet fellow author and blogger, Mary Smith. Mary kindly showed us around her lovely town and I took a few pictures of some interesting doors.

This is what Wikipedia says about Dumfries:

“Dumfries is a market town and former royal burgh within the Dumfries and Galloway council area of Scotland, which in turn is part of the United Kingdom. It is located near the mouth of the River Nith into the Solway Firth about 25 miles by road from the Anglo-Scottish border and just 15 miles away from Cumbria by air.”

I thought this painted door was rather beautiful

Dumfries has a number of interesting museums and is famed for its connection with Scotland’s National Bard, Robert Burns. More about all these places next week. There is no Thursday Doors next week so my post will be a tour of Dumfries with no focus on doors.

One famous person I must mention in this post is Robert the Bruce.

“Robert the Bruce was one of the most famous warriors of his generation and eventually led Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence against England. He fought successfully during his reign to regain Scotland’s place as an independent country and is now revered in Scotland as a national hero.”

In 1306, Robert was involved in the murder of John Comyn, his chief rival for the throne. This led to him being excommunicated by Pope Clement V (although he received absolution from Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow).

You can read more about Robert the Bruce here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Bruce

The cast of the skull of Robert the Bruce, along with fragments of bone material said to have been taken from the skeleton of Robert the Bruce in 1818, was presented to Dumfries Museum in 1996.  It had belonged to Wallace Black, a Dumfries man. Family tradition has it that he was given the cast and the bone material by a friend who was present when the skeleton was discovered. Read more about this skull here: http://www.futuremuseum.co.uk/collections/people/lives-in-key-periods/the-medieval-period-(1100ad-1499ad)/wars-of-independence/robert-(i)-the-bruce/robert-the-bruce,-cast-of-his-skull.aspx

You can join Thursday Doors here: https://nofacilities.com/2021/07/22/hartford-bpoe-hartford-club/

61 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Dumfries, Scotland

    1. HI Darlene, it is a great door. I think travelling with Mary would be fantastic. She is a veritable encyclopedia of British history. Greg is great to travel with too. He looks everywhere up before we go anywhere and tells us all about it. Our own guide.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. Love the painted door. Cyberspouse was born in Dumfries – in the nursing home – Annan was the town he was brought up in, Dumfries they used to visit on the bus. The Solway Firth is a lovely area.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Oh my goodness, Robbie, that painted door is amazing! I also love the what I thought was grill work in the window of the door below it on the right, but appears to be lace curtains. It’s a great looking door in any case.

    I always enjoy reading the history you include. I like how you travel, you take an active interest in the places you visit. Thanks for sharing this visit with us. I look forward to learning more of the history.

    I hope you’re having a great weekend.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Hi Dan, I am glad you liked that painted door. I thought it was beautiful. The door you mentioned does have lace curtains. The doors in the UK are accessible for picture taking, unlike South Africa where most doors are hidden behind high walls. I hope you have a good break this next week.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Robbie, what gorgeous doors you shared with us today. That painted door is wonderful. I especially love that the railing at the sides of the steps are painted like the door. Details are everything, like in writing! Thanks for sharing your travels with us, Robbie. I live vicariously through you, as we haven’t gotten back to traveling yet. I always enjoy your posts!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. HI John, British and European history is very brutal. I was reading about Gilles de Rais yesterday. He is believed to have murdered between 100 and 200 children. People seemed to be very impervious to murder and death in the past.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ah, Robbie! You reminded me of the words of Robert the Bruce: “We fight not for glory, nor for wealth, nor honour but only and alone for freedom which no good man surrenders but with his life.” I share you love of history and doors. May we find many doors to walk through and embrace the adventures waiting on the other side. Every day we made history.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. HI Rebecca, it is very true that we are living future history. The story of Robert the Bruce fascinated me. People were very savage at that time. I am currently reading a book about the Celts and the Romans, so interesting. Thanks for visiting, Rebecca.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Wow, I also love that painted door. I really wanted to go to Dumfries when we were in Scotland for the Robbie Burns connection, but time was at a minimum. It is still on my list for my next visit. I will watch for your post next week.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Lovely painted door! Thanks for the history. It is always interesting how bits of bone are cared for.
    Our own Daniel Boone is said to be resting in two different cemeteries!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. love all your doors, Robbie – tried to comment on your colosseum post, how impressed I was with those too, but my wordpress seems to be acting up…

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.